How to get started with LFS system [on hold]

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I want to develop an OS using Linux from Scratch and Linux Kernel. I am currently using Windows 10 Pro. Do I need to install a Linux distribution like ubuntu on my computer side by side. Or I can install ubuntu app package on Windows 10 from Microsoft Store by enabling ‘Windows Subsystem for Linux’ to develop my OS. Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?

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put on hold as too broad by Rui F Ribeiro, muru, Michael Homer, Wieland, RalfFriedl Nov 18 at 11:42

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    The traditional approach to LFS requires creating & mounting real partitions, which WSL can’t do, but it ought to be possible to modify the instructions to do much of the work in that environment (though obviously unable to run it for real at the end since you couldn’t make the partitions). How much will that be a problem for you? That is, what is your goal in making this system? Further, how confident do you feel about making those modifications on the fly? I suspect, given this question, not enough for it to be plausible to carry this out, but I could be wrong – be realistic, though.
    – Michael Homer
    Nov 18 at 8:08

up vote
-1
down vote

favorite

I want to develop an OS using Linux from Scratch and Linux Kernel. I am currently using Windows 10 Pro. Do I need to install a Linux distribution like ubuntu on my computer side by side. Or I can install ubuntu app package on Windows 10 from Microsoft Store by enabling ‘Windows Subsystem for Linux’ to develop my OS. Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?

share|improve this question

New contributor
Sam is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering.
Check out our Code of Conduct.

put on hold as too broad by Rui F Ribeiro, muru, Michael Homer, Wieland, RalfFriedl Nov 18 at 11:42

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1

    The traditional approach to LFS requires creating & mounting real partitions, which WSL can’t do, but it ought to be possible to modify the instructions to do much of the work in that environment (though obviously unable to run it for real at the end since you couldn’t make the partitions). How much will that be a problem for you? That is, what is your goal in making this system? Further, how confident do you feel about making those modifications on the fly? I suspect, given this question, not enough for it to be plausible to carry this out, but I could be wrong – be realistic, though.
    – Michael Homer
    Nov 18 at 8:08

up vote
-1
down vote

favorite

up vote
-1
down vote

favorite

I want to develop an OS using Linux from Scratch and Linux Kernel. I am currently using Windows 10 Pro. Do I need to install a Linux distribution like ubuntu on my computer side by side. Or I can install ubuntu app package on Windows 10 from Microsoft Store by enabling ‘Windows Subsystem for Linux’ to develop my OS. Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?

share|improve this question

New contributor
Sam is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering.
Check out our Code of Conduct.

I want to develop an OS using Linux from Scratch and Linux Kernel. I am currently using Windows 10 Pro. Do I need to install a Linux distribution like ubuntu on my computer side by side. Or I can install ubuntu app package on Windows 10 from Microsoft Store by enabling ‘Windows Subsystem for Linux’ to develop my OS. Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?

linux

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New contributor
Sam is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering.
Check out our Code of Conduct.

share|improve this question

New contributor
Sam is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering.
Check out our Code of Conduct.

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edited Nov 18 at 10:57

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asked Nov 18 at 7:56

Sam

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New contributor
Sam is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering.
Check out our Code of Conduct.

New contributor

Sam is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering.
Check out our Code of Conduct.

Sam is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering.
Check out our Code of Conduct.

put on hold as too broad by Rui F Ribeiro, muru, Michael Homer, Wieland, RalfFriedl Nov 18 at 11:42

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

put on hold as too broad by Rui F Ribeiro, muru, Michael Homer, Wieland, RalfFriedl Nov 18 at 11:42

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1

    The traditional approach to LFS requires creating & mounting real partitions, which WSL can’t do, but it ought to be possible to modify the instructions to do much of the work in that environment (though obviously unable to run it for real at the end since you couldn’t make the partitions). How much will that be a problem for you? That is, what is your goal in making this system? Further, how confident do you feel about making those modifications on the fly? I suspect, given this question, not enough for it to be plausible to carry this out, but I could be wrong – be realistic, though.
    – Michael Homer
    Nov 18 at 8:08

  • 1

    The traditional approach to LFS requires creating & mounting real partitions, which WSL can’t do, but it ought to be possible to modify the instructions to do much of the work in that environment (though obviously unable to run it for real at the end since you couldn’t make the partitions). How much will that be a problem for you? That is, what is your goal in making this system? Further, how confident do you feel about making those modifications on the fly? I suspect, given this question, not enough for it to be plausible to carry this out, but I could be wrong – be realistic, though.
    – Michael Homer
    Nov 18 at 8:08

1

1

The traditional approach to LFS requires creating & mounting real partitions, which WSL can’t do, but it ought to be possible to modify the instructions to do much of the work in that environment (though obviously unable to run it for real at the end since you couldn’t make the partitions). How much will that be a problem for you? That is, what is your goal in making this system? Further, how confident do you feel about making those modifications on the fly? I suspect, given this question, not enough for it to be plausible to carry this out, but I could be wrong – be realistic, though.
– Michael Homer
Nov 18 at 8:08

The traditional approach to LFS requires creating & mounting real partitions, which WSL can’t do, but it ought to be possible to modify the instructions to do much of the work in that environment (though obviously unable to run it for real at the end since you couldn’t make the partitions). How much will that be a problem for you? That is, what is your goal in making this system? Further, how confident do you feel about making those modifications on the fly? I suspect, given this question, not enough for it to be plausible to carry this out, but I could be wrong – be realistic, though.
– Michael Homer
Nov 18 at 8:08

1 Answer
1

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up vote
-1
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accepted

Checking the How to Build an LFS System section of the Introduction Chapter, you might notice:

The LFS system will be built by using an already installed Linux distribution (such as Debian, OpenMandriva, Fedora, or openSUSE).

and

As an alternative to installing a separate distribution onto your machine, you may wish to use a LiveCD from a commercial distribution.

Checking Host System Requirements in Preparing the Host System chapter you will find a series of tools that are required. Are they available in Ubuntu app? Or could you install them?

Another important note you can find in Creating a New Partition section of the Preparing the Host System chapter

Like most other operating systems, LFS is usually installed on a dedicated partition. The recommended approach to building an LFS system is to use an available empty partition or, if you have enough unpartitioned space, to create one.

I think that if you are an experiences Windows, Linux and LFS user … all of this notes can be easily addressed, however the official documentation doesn’t seem to refer to support of build the LFS system from windows.

If I can give my advice it will be: use a virtual machine where you can install a linux distribution and have enough partitions for your to play with while building the LFS system. If something goes wrong you can just throw all away without messing up with your current system. Once you have more experience and successfully installed LFS using the official procedure you can try again with your original plan.

share|improve this answer

  • How much space do you think should i reserve for my partition? Is 25 GB enough
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:42

  • My question is: Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:57

1 Answer
1

active

oldest

votes

1 Answer
1

active

oldest

votes

active

oldest

votes

active

oldest

votes

up vote
-1
down vote

accepted

Checking the How to Build an LFS System section of the Introduction Chapter, you might notice:

The LFS system will be built by using an already installed Linux distribution (such as Debian, OpenMandriva, Fedora, or openSUSE).

and

As an alternative to installing a separate distribution onto your machine, you may wish to use a LiveCD from a commercial distribution.

Checking Host System Requirements in Preparing the Host System chapter you will find a series of tools that are required. Are they available in Ubuntu app? Or could you install them?

Another important note you can find in Creating a New Partition section of the Preparing the Host System chapter

Like most other operating systems, LFS is usually installed on a dedicated partition. The recommended approach to building an LFS system is to use an available empty partition or, if you have enough unpartitioned space, to create one.

I think that if you are an experiences Windows, Linux and LFS user … all of this notes can be easily addressed, however the official documentation doesn’t seem to refer to support of build the LFS system from windows.

If I can give my advice it will be: use a virtual machine where you can install a linux distribution and have enough partitions for your to play with while building the LFS system. If something goes wrong you can just throw all away without messing up with your current system. Once you have more experience and successfully installed LFS using the official procedure you can try again with your original plan.

share|improve this answer

  • How much space do you think should i reserve for my partition? Is 25 GB enough
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:42

  • My question is: Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:57

up vote
-1
down vote

accepted

Checking the How to Build an LFS System section of the Introduction Chapter, you might notice:

The LFS system will be built by using an already installed Linux distribution (such as Debian, OpenMandriva, Fedora, or openSUSE).

and

As an alternative to installing a separate distribution onto your machine, you may wish to use a LiveCD from a commercial distribution.

Checking Host System Requirements in Preparing the Host System chapter you will find a series of tools that are required. Are they available in Ubuntu app? Or could you install them?

Another important note you can find in Creating a New Partition section of the Preparing the Host System chapter

Like most other operating systems, LFS is usually installed on a dedicated partition. The recommended approach to building an LFS system is to use an available empty partition or, if you have enough unpartitioned space, to create one.

I think that if you are an experiences Windows, Linux and LFS user … all of this notes can be easily addressed, however the official documentation doesn’t seem to refer to support of build the LFS system from windows.

If I can give my advice it will be: use a virtual machine where you can install a linux distribution and have enough partitions for your to play with while building the LFS system. If something goes wrong you can just throw all away without messing up with your current system. Once you have more experience and successfully installed LFS using the official procedure you can try again with your original plan.

share|improve this answer

  • How much space do you think should i reserve for my partition? Is 25 GB enough
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:42

  • My question is: Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:57

up vote
-1
down vote

accepted

up vote
-1
down vote

accepted

Checking the How to Build an LFS System section of the Introduction Chapter, you might notice:

The LFS system will be built by using an already installed Linux distribution (such as Debian, OpenMandriva, Fedora, or openSUSE).

and

As an alternative to installing a separate distribution onto your machine, you may wish to use a LiveCD from a commercial distribution.

Checking Host System Requirements in Preparing the Host System chapter you will find a series of tools that are required. Are they available in Ubuntu app? Or could you install them?

Another important note you can find in Creating a New Partition section of the Preparing the Host System chapter

Like most other operating systems, LFS is usually installed on a dedicated partition. The recommended approach to building an LFS system is to use an available empty partition or, if you have enough unpartitioned space, to create one.

I think that if you are an experiences Windows, Linux and LFS user … all of this notes can be easily addressed, however the official documentation doesn’t seem to refer to support of build the LFS system from windows.

If I can give my advice it will be: use a virtual machine where you can install a linux distribution and have enough partitions for your to play with while building the LFS system. If something goes wrong you can just throw all away without messing up with your current system. Once you have more experience and successfully installed LFS using the official procedure you can try again with your original plan.

share|improve this answer

Checking the How to Build an LFS System section of the Introduction Chapter, you might notice:

The LFS system will be built by using an already installed Linux distribution (such as Debian, OpenMandriva, Fedora, or openSUSE).

and

As an alternative to installing a separate distribution onto your machine, you may wish to use a LiveCD from a commercial distribution.

Checking Host System Requirements in Preparing the Host System chapter you will find a series of tools that are required. Are they available in Ubuntu app? Or could you install them?

Another important note you can find in Creating a New Partition section of the Preparing the Host System chapter

Like most other operating systems, LFS is usually installed on a dedicated partition. The recommended approach to building an LFS system is to use an available empty partition or, if you have enough unpartitioned space, to create one.

I think that if you are an experiences Windows, Linux and LFS user … all of this notes can be easily addressed, however the official documentation doesn’t seem to refer to support of build the LFS system from windows.

If I can give my advice it will be: use a virtual machine where you can install a linux distribution and have enough partitions for your to play with while building the LFS system. If something goes wrong you can just throw all away without messing up with your current system. Once you have more experience and successfully installed LFS using the official procedure you can try again with your original plan.

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answered Nov 18 at 8:57

Scantlight

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  • How much space do you think should i reserve for my partition? Is 25 GB enough
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:42

  • My question is: Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:57

  • How much space do you think should i reserve for my partition? Is 25 GB enough
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:42

  • My question is: Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?
    – Sam
    Nov 18 at 10:57

How much space do you think should i reserve for my partition? Is 25 GB enough
– Sam
Nov 18 at 10:42

How much space do you think should i reserve for my partition? Is 25 GB enough
– Sam
Nov 18 at 10:42

My question is: Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?
– Sam
Nov 18 at 10:57

My question is: Does the latter serve all the capabilities required to develop an OS?
– Sam
Nov 18 at 10:57

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