Can DPAK be used in a through hole pcb if desperate?

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I purchased the wrong component, have no time to order another one. Best way to go about doing this on a PCB with the plated holes?

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/vishay/irfr9214pbf/?qs=iXwvDCb7I7hjm2Ycf0pGIQ%3d%3d&countrycode=US&currencycode=USD

I have a very small heat sink that is slightly larger than the size of the chip, it came with my Raspberry Pi as a heat sink for the baby sized chip on it.

The backside of the chip is the drain, left pin front-side is gate, right pin source.

enter image description here

Schematic:
enter image description here

The circuit is a pulse generation controller that drives an ultrasonic transducer with 100ns pulses, at a sending rate of about 200-800Hz. The energy in each pulse is very low. Cadence simulates the circuit as I’d expect, can post waves graphs if requested. The BJTs do a good job of controlling the current flow for the desired amount of time, don’t get spooked because of the high voltage going through the transformer :^) The zener diode avalanches at 220V, and the power mosfet is rated for 250V.

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  • How much power does the transistor have to dissipate?
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:01

  • What is your required power dissipation?
    – Spehro Pefhany
    Nov 29 at 5:01

  • ” Power dissipation levels up to 1.5 W are possible in typical surface mount applications.”
    – snowg
    Nov 29 at 5:02

  • You can certainly solder it onto that PCB, but the power dissipation capability will be reduced. Normally a DPAK relies on thermal transfer to the large copper pad. But that is a big package, and if you put the heatsink on the front of it, it can probably dissipate a Watt indefinitely without self-destructing.
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:02

  • 4

    You are quoting from the transistor datasheet. But that is not what Spehro and I are asking. We want to know how much it WILL dissipate based on the circuit you are building. What does the circuit do? Do you have a schematic?
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:04

up vote
2
down vote

favorite

1

I purchased the wrong component, have no time to order another one. Best way to go about doing this on a PCB with the plated holes?

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/vishay/irfr9214pbf/?qs=iXwvDCb7I7hjm2Ycf0pGIQ%3d%3d&countrycode=US&currencycode=USD

I have a very small heat sink that is slightly larger than the size of the chip, it came with my Raspberry Pi as a heat sink for the baby sized chip on it.

The backside of the chip is the drain, left pin front-side is gate, right pin source.

enter image description here

Schematic:
enter image description here

The circuit is a pulse generation controller that drives an ultrasonic transducer with 100ns pulses, at a sending rate of about 200-800Hz. The energy in each pulse is very low. Cadence simulates the circuit as I’d expect, can post waves graphs if requested. The BJTs do a good job of controlling the current flow for the desired amount of time, don’t get spooked because of the high voltage going through the transformer :^) The zener diode avalanches at 220V, and the power mosfet is rated for 250V.

share|improve this question

  • How much power does the transistor have to dissipate?
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:01

  • What is your required power dissipation?
    – Spehro Pefhany
    Nov 29 at 5:01

  • ” Power dissipation levels up to 1.5 W are possible in typical surface mount applications.”
    – snowg
    Nov 29 at 5:02

  • You can certainly solder it onto that PCB, but the power dissipation capability will be reduced. Normally a DPAK relies on thermal transfer to the large copper pad. But that is a big package, and if you put the heatsink on the front of it, it can probably dissipate a Watt indefinitely without self-destructing.
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:02

  • 4

    You are quoting from the transistor datasheet. But that is not what Spehro and I are asking. We want to know how much it WILL dissipate based on the circuit you are building. What does the circuit do? Do you have a schematic?
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:04

up vote
2
down vote

favorite

1

up vote
2
down vote

favorite

1
1

I purchased the wrong component, have no time to order another one. Best way to go about doing this on a PCB with the plated holes?

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/vishay/irfr9214pbf/?qs=iXwvDCb7I7hjm2Ycf0pGIQ%3d%3d&countrycode=US&currencycode=USD

I have a very small heat sink that is slightly larger than the size of the chip, it came with my Raspberry Pi as a heat sink for the baby sized chip on it.

The backside of the chip is the drain, left pin front-side is gate, right pin source.

enter image description here

Schematic:
enter image description here

The circuit is a pulse generation controller that drives an ultrasonic transducer with 100ns pulses, at a sending rate of about 200-800Hz. The energy in each pulse is very low. Cadence simulates the circuit as I’d expect, can post waves graphs if requested. The BJTs do a good job of controlling the current flow for the desired amount of time, don’t get spooked because of the high voltage going through the transformer :^) The zener diode avalanches at 220V, and the power mosfet is rated for 250V.

share|improve this question

I purchased the wrong component, have no time to order another one. Best way to go about doing this on a PCB with the plated holes?

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/vishay/irfr9214pbf/?qs=iXwvDCb7I7hjm2Ycf0pGIQ%3d%3d&countrycode=US&currencycode=USD

I have a very small heat sink that is slightly larger than the size of the chip, it came with my Raspberry Pi as a heat sink for the baby sized chip on it.

The backside of the chip is the drain, left pin front-side is gate, right pin source.

enter image description here

Schematic:
enter image description here

The circuit is a pulse generation controller that drives an ultrasonic transducer with 100ns pulses, at a sending rate of about 200-800Hz. The energy in each pulse is very low. Cadence simulates the circuit as I’d expect, can post waves graphs if requested. The BJTs do a good job of controlling the current flow for the desired amount of time, don’t get spooked because of the high voltage going through the transformer :^) The zener diode avalanches at 220V, and the power mosfet is rated for 250V.

soldering

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edited Nov 29 at 5:09

asked Nov 29 at 4:54

snowg

827

827

  • How much power does the transistor have to dissipate?
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:01

  • What is your required power dissipation?
    – Spehro Pefhany
    Nov 29 at 5:01

  • ” Power dissipation levels up to 1.5 W are possible in typical surface mount applications.”
    – snowg
    Nov 29 at 5:02

  • You can certainly solder it onto that PCB, but the power dissipation capability will be reduced. Normally a DPAK relies on thermal transfer to the large copper pad. But that is a big package, and if you put the heatsink on the front of it, it can probably dissipate a Watt indefinitely without self-destructing.
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:02

  • 4

    You are quoting from the transistor datasheet. But that is not what Spehro and I are asking. We want to know how much it WILL dissipate based on the circuit you are building. What does the circuit do? Do you have a schematic?
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:04

  • How much power does the transistor have to dissipate?
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:01

  • What is your required power dissipation?
    – Spehro Pefhany
    Nov 29 at 5:01

  • ” Power dissipation levels up to 1.5 W are possible in typical surface mount applications.”
    – snowg
    Nov 29 at 5:02

  • You can certainly solder it onto that PCB, but the power dissipation capability will be reduced. Normally a DPAK relies on thermal transfer to the large copper pad. But that is a big package, and if you put the heatsink on the front of it, it can probably dissipate a Watt indefinitely without self-destructing.
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:02

  • 4

    You are quoting from the transistor datasheet. But that is not what Spehro and I are asking. We want to know how much it WILL dissipate based on the circuit you are building. What does the circuit do? Do you have a schematic?
    – mkeith
    Nov 29 at 5:04

How much power does the transistor have to dissipate?
– mkeith
Nov 29 at 5:01

How much power does the transistor have to dissipate?
– mkeith
Nov 29 at 5:01

What is your required power dissipation?
– Spehro Pefhany
Nov 29 at 5:01

What is your required power dissipation?
– Spehro Pefhany
Nov 29 at 5:01

” Power dissipation levels up to 1.5 W are possible in typical surface mount applications.”
– snowg
Nov 29 at 5:02

” Power dissipation levels up to 1.5 W are possible in typical surface mount applications.”
– snowg
Nov 29 at 5:02

You can certainly solder it onto that PCB, but the power dissipation capability will be reduced. Normally a DPAK relies on thermal transfer to the large copper pad. But that is a big package, and if you put the heatsink on the front of it, it can probably dissipate a Watt indefinitely without self-destructing.
– mkeith
Nov 29 at 5:02

You can certainly solder it onto that PCB, but the power dissipation capability will be reduced. Normally a DPAK relies on thermal transfer to the large copper pad. But that is a big package, and if you put the heatsink on the front of it, it can probably dissipate a Watt indefinitely without self-destructing.
– mkeith
Nov 29 at 5:02

4

4

You are quoting from the transistor datasheet. But that is not what Spehro and I are asking. We want to know how much it WILL dissipate based on the circuit you are building. What does the circuit do? Do you have a schematic?
– mkeith
Nov 29 at 5:04

You are quoting from the transistor datasheet. But that is not what Spehro and I are asking. We want to know how much it WILL dissipate based on the circuit you are building. What does the circuit do? Do you have a schematic?
– mkeith
Nov 29 at 5:04

2 Answers
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up vote
4
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accepted

When doing hand assembly you have a lot of options that aren’t practical in production.

you could surface-mount it on that matrix board – if it gets too hot solder thick copper wires into the holes under the the drain pad to act as a heatsink. solder conducts heat better than any affordable non-metallic interface material.
or you could plan ahead and lay down some copper sheet under the drain pad when mounting it and extend the other tabs to reach the circuit board.

A DPAK is basically the same as a TO220 with the leads bent and bits cut off, you could solder pins onto it (that middle tab connects to the drain pad just like in a TO220) and use it through-hole, and optionally solder or clamp a heatsink to the drain pad.

share|improve this answer

    up vote
    3
    down vote

    The easiest thing to do is to grab some copper clad pcb and make a quick smd to dip adapter board. You don’t need to etch it, for an IC as big as a dpak you can just cut groves on the pcb using a dremel cutting wheel or drill bit. And use wire or a standard 0.1″ header to connect it to the pcb you have there.

    This, but bigger
    enter image description here

    share|improve this answer

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      2 Answers
      2

      active

      oldest

      votes

      2 Answers
      2

      active

      oldest

      votes

      active

      oldest

      votes

      active

      oldest

      votes

      up vote
      4
      down vote

      accepted

      When doing hand assembly you have a lot of options that aren’t practical in production.

      you could surface-mount it on that matrix board – if it gets too hot solder thick copper wires into the holes under the the drain pad to act as a heatsink. solder conducts heat better than any affordable non-metallic interface material.
      or you could plan ahead and lay down some copper sheet under the drain pad when mounting it and extend the other tabs to reach the circuit board.

      A DPAK is basically the same as a TO220 with the leads bent and bits cut off, you could solder pins onto it (that middle tab connects to the drain pad just like in a TO220) and use it through-hole, and optionally solder or clamp a heatsink to the drain pad.

      share|improve this answer

        up vote
        4
        down vote

        accepted

        When doing hand assembly you have a lot of options that aren’t practical in production.

        you could surface-mount it on that matrix board – if it gets too hot solder thick copper wires into the holes under the the drain pad to act as a heatsink. solder conducts heat better than any affordable non-metallic interface material.
        or you could plan ahead and lay down some copper sheet under the drain pad when mounting it and extend the other tabs to reach the circuit board.

        A DPAK is basically the same as a TO220 with the leads bent and bits cut off, you could solder pins onto it (that middle tab connects to the drain pad just like in a TO220) and use it through-hole, and optionally solder or clamp a heatsink to the drain pad.

        share|improve this answer

          up vote
          4
          down vote

          accepted

          up vote
          4
          down vote

          accepted

          When doing hand assembly you have a lot of options that aren’t practical in production.

          you could surface-mount it on that matrix board – if it gets too hot solder thick copper wires into the holes under the the drain pad to act as a heatsink. solder conducts heat better than any affordable non-metallic interface material.
          or you could plan ahead and lay down some copper sheet under the drain pad when mounting it and extend the other tabs to reach the circuit board.

          A DPAK is basically the same as a TO220 with the leads bent and bits cut off, you could solder pins onto it (that middle tab connects to the drain pad just like in a TO220) and use it through-hole, and optionally solder or clamp a heatsink to the drain pad.

          share|improve this answer

          When doing hand assembly you have a lot of options that aren’t practical in production.

          you could surface-mount it on that matrix board – if it gets too hot solder thick copper wires into the holes under the the drain pad to act as a heatsink. solder conducts heat better than any affordable non-metallic interface material.
          or you could plan ahead and lay down some copper sheet under the drain pad when mounting it and extend the other tabs to reach the circuit board.

          A DPAK is basically the same as a TO220 with the leads bent and bits cut off, you could solder pins onto it (that middle tab connects to the drain pad just like in a TO220) and use it through-hole, and optionally solder or clamp a heatsink to the drain pad.

          share|improve this answer

          share|improve this answer

          share|improve this answer

          edited Nov 29 at 7:04

          answered Nov 29 at 5:41

          Jasen

          9,6751428

          9,6751428

              up vote
              3
              down vote

              The easiest thing to do is to grab some copper clad pcb and make a quick smd to dip adapter board. You don’t need to etch it, for an IC as big as a dpak you can just cut groves on the pcb using a dremel cutting wheel or drill bit. And use wire or a standard 0.1″ header to connect it to the pcb you have there.

              This, but bigger
              enter image description here

              share|improve this answer

                up vote
                3
                down vote

                The easiest thing to do is to grab some copper clad pcb and make a quick smd to dip adapter board. You don’t need to etch it, for an IC as big as a dpak you can just cut groves on the pcb using a dremel cutting wheel or drill bit. And use wire or a standard 0.1″ header to connect it to the pcb you have there.

                This, but bigger
                enter image description here

                share|improve this answer

                  up vote
                  3
                  down vote

                  up vote
                  3
                  down vote

                  The easiest thing to do is to grab some copper clad pcb and make a quick smd to dip adapter board. You don’t need to etch it, for an IC as big as a dpak you can just cut groves on the pcb using a dremel cutting wheel or drill bit. And use wire or a standard 0.1″ header to connect it to the pcb you have there.

                  This, but bigger
                  enter image description here

                  share|improve this answer

                  The easiest thing to do is to grab some copper clad pcb and make a quick smd to dip adapter board. You don’t need to etch it, for an IC as big as a dpak you can just cut groves on the pcb using a dremel cutting wheel or drill bit. And use wire or a standard 0.1″ header to connect it to the pcb you have there.

                  This, but bigger
                  enter image description here

                  share|improve this answer

                  share|improve this answer

                  share|improve this answer

                  answered Nov 29 at 7:57

                  Passerby

                  56.5k451146

                  56.5k451146

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