Does an Arahant accumulate kamma in his/her life?

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  • Cetana (Intention) is a universal mental factor which can be seen in every consciousness even in Arahants’.

  • Kamma is the intention in one’s consciousness.

I have thought about the below statements based on the above mentioned two factors. But couldn’t come to a conclusion. My questions are,

  1. “An Arahant accumulates kamma in his/her life and has kammic fruit for that kamma in the same life.” Is this statement true?

  2. “An Arahant accumulates kamma in his/her life but has no kammic fruit for that kamma.” Is this statement true?

  3. “Intention (The mental factor, Cetana) is not kamma in Arahants’ consciousness” Is this statement true?

share|improve this question

    up vote
    3
    down vote

    favorite

    • Cetana (Intention) is a universal mental factor which can be seen in every consciousness even in Arahants’.

    • Kamma is the intention in one’s consciousness.

    I have thought about the below statements based on the above mentioned two factors. But couldn’t come to a conclusion. My questions are,

    1. “An Arahant accumulates kamma in his/her life and has kammic fruit for that kamma in the same life.” Is this statement true?

    2. “An Arahant accumulates kamma in his/her life but has no kammic fruit for that kamma.” Is this statement true?

    3. “Intention (The mental factor, Cetana) is not kamma in Arahants’ consciousness” Is this statement true?

    share|improve this question

      up vote
      3
      down vote

      favorite

      up vote
      3
      down vote

      favorite

      • Cetana (Intention) is a universal mental factor which can be seen in every consciousness even in Arahants’.

      • Kamma is the intention in one’s consciousness.

      I have thought about the below statements based on the above mentioned two factors. But couldn’t come to a conclusion. My questions are,

      1. “An Arahant accumulates kamma in his/her life and has kammic fruit for that kamma in the same life.” Is this statement true?

      2. “An Arahant accumulates kamma in his/her life but has no kammic fruit for that kamma.” Is this statement true?

      3. “Intention (The mental factor, Cetana) is not kamma in Arahants’ consciousness” Is this statement true?

      share|improve this question

      • Cetana (Intention) is a universal mental factor which can be seen in every consciousness even in Arahants’.

      • Kamma is the intention in one’s consciousness.

      I have thought about the below statements based on the above mentioned two factors. But couldn’t come to a conclusion. My questions are,

      1. “An Arahant accumulates kamma in his/her life and has kammic fruit for that kamma in the same life.” Is this statement true?

      2. “An Arahant accumulates kamma in his/her life but has no kammic fruit for that kamma.” Is this statement true?

      3. “Intention (The mental factor, Cetana) is not kamma in Arahants’ consciousness” Is this statement true?

      theravada karma abhidhamma mental-factors

      share|improve this question

      share|improve this question

      share|improve this question

      share|improve this question

      edited Nov 29 at 15:57

      Andrei Volkov

      37.1k330107

      37.1k330107

      asked Nov 29 at 4:42

      Damith

      637

      637

          2 Answers
          2

          active

          oldest

          votes

          up vote
          3
          down vote

          accepted

          Cittas are classified in various ways. One such classification is according to their nature. In this classification we have:

          1. Cittas which are resultant states of consciousness, vipaaka, the effects of previous kamma.
          2. Cittas which are causes for action (kamma) through body, speech, or mind. We may call these “causative cittas.” A wholesome citta (kusala citta) will issue in wholesome action and an unwholesome one (akusala citta) in unwholesome action.
          3. Cittas which are neither kamma nor its result. These are called kiriya cittas. They are kammically ineffective, being merely functional. Some kiriya cittas perform simple functions in the process of consciousness, others represent the actions and thoughts of arahants, who no longer generate fresh kamma. Read more here

          Therefore,

          • Statement 1: False
          • Statement 2: False
          • Statement 3: True, but they are called kiriya cittas. The term is indicative of the functional nature which is different from the intention of a worldly person.
          share|improve this answer

          • Sir, when we talk about cetana, we can say, its characteristic is the state of willing, its function is to accumulate (kamma), and its manifestation is coordination. Its proximate cause is the associated states. (link) Then what is the function of Cetana in a Kriya citta?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 9:06

          • 1

            The function of Kiriya citta is not to accumulate kamma, but to merely carry out a function. Ex: Avajjana citta just performs the function of advertence
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 29 at 9:20

          • Sir, when we study mental factors we study their caracteristic (Lakkhana), their function (Rasa), their manifestation (Paccupatthana), and their proximate cause (Padatthana). I’d like to know the function of Cetana mental factor which appears in a Kiriya citta. It should be definitely different from the Cetana which appears in 81 mundane cittas.
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 4:16

          • @Damith you are repeating the same question 🙂
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 5:25

          • 1

            Cetana is part of every Citta. But Cetana becomes Karma only in Javana Cittas of worldlings. When it comes to Arahaths, Cetana in Javanas do not become Karma as they are indeterminate. In other words, neither wholesome nor unwholesome. So you could say the function of Cetana in Kiriya Cittas is to be non-accumulative(karmically ineffective).
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 11:03

          up vote
          2
          down vote

          The consciousness of an Arahant is ethically indeterminate so he does not accumulate Kamma.

          From The Abhidhamma in Practice —

          For the Arahant, the liberated one, the cittas that
          arise in him can no longer be associated with any unwholesome roots. The cittas that the
          Arahant experiences are neither wholesome nor unwholesome, as he does not generate any
          further kamma; his cittas are exclusively indeterminate.

          and:

          The universals and particulars are, in themselves, ethically indeterminate but become
          wholesome, unwholesome, or neither, depending on the state of consciousness in which they
          occur.

          share|improve this answer

          • Sir, Then the third statement of my question is correct. This leads me to come to a conclusion that, not all cetana (intension) is kamma but depends on the state of consciousness. Am I correct?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 7:22

          • Agree. I see your point. I do not have a satisfactory answer to your question at his stage. -) Perhaps Budha wanted to describe Kamma, not Cetana. Perhaps all Kamma is Cetana but all Cetana is not Kamma.
            – SarathW
            Nov 29 at 8:56

          • @Damith Not every kamma bears fruit. Kamma can be so light or ethically neutral that it doesn’t lead to anything. Think of putting on your shoes, for instance. It’s kamma, but clearly not fruit bearing or ethically relevant.
            – Medhiṇī
            Nov 29 at 9:32

          • @Medhini Millions of consciousness have been originated and dissolved while we are doing a certain thing like putting on our shoes. Do you mean those consciousness altogether is kamma and bears no fruit?
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 3:47

          Your Answer

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          2 Answers
          2

          active

          oldest

          votes

          2 Answers
          2

          active

          oldest

          votes

          active

          oldest

          votes

          active

          oldest

          votes

          up vote
          3
          down vote

          accepted

          Cittas are classified in various ways. One such classification is according to their nature. In this classification we have:

          1. Cittas which are resultant states of consciousness, vipaaka, the effects of previous kamma.
          2. Cittas which are causes for action (kamma) through body, speech, or mind. We may call these “causative cittas.” A wholesome citta (kusala citta) will issue in wholesome action and an unwholesome one (akusala citta) in unwholesome action.
          3. Cittas which are neither kamma nor its result. These are called kiriya cittas. They are kammically ineffective, being merely functional. Some kiriya cittas perform simple functions in the process of consciousness, others represent the actions and thoughts of arahants, who no longer generate fresh kamma. Read more here

          Therefore,

          • Statement 1: False
          • Statement 2: False
          • Statement 3: True, but they are called kiriya cittas. The term is indicative of the functional nature which is different from the intention of a worldly person.
          share|improve this answer

          • Sir, when we talk about cetana, we can say, its characteristic is the state of willing, its function is to accumulate (kamma), and its manifestation is coordination. Its proximate cause is the associated states. (link) Then what is the function of Cetana in a Kriya citta?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 9:06

          • 1

            The function of Kiriya citta is not to accumulate kamma, but to merely carry out a function. Ex: Avajjana citta just performs the function of advertence
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 29 at 9:20

          • Sir, when we study mental factors we study their caracteristic (Lakkhana), their function (Rasa), their manifestation (Paccupatthana), and their proximate cause (Padatthana). I’d like to know the function of Cetana mental factor which appears in a Kiriya citta. It should be definitely different from the Cetana which appears in 81 mundane cittas.
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 4:16

          • @Damith you are repeating the same question 🙂
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 5:25

          • 1

            Cetana is part of every Citta. But Cetana becomes Karma only in Javana Cittas of worldlings. When it comes to Arahaths, Cetana in Javanas do not become Karma as they are indeterminate. In other words, neither wholesome nor unwholesome. So you could say the function of Cetana in Kiriya Cittas is to be non-accumulative(karmically ineffective).
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 11:03

          up vote
          3
          down vote

          accepted

          Cittas are classified in various ways. One such classification is according to their nature. In this classification we have:

          1. Cittas which are resultant states of consciousness, vipaaka, the effects of previous kamma.
          2. Cittas which are causes for action (kamma) through body, speech, or mind. We may call these “causative cittas.” A wholesome citta (kusala citta) will issue in wholesome action and an unwholesome one (akusala citta) in unwholesome action.
          3. Cittas which are neither kamma nor its result. These are called kiriya cittas. They are kammically ineffective, being merely functional. Some kiriya cittas perform simple functions in the process of consciousness, others represent the actions and thoughts of arahants, who no longer generate fresh kamma. Read more here

          Therefore,

          • Statement 1: False
          • Statement 2: False
          • Statement 3: True, but they are called kiriya cittas. The term is indicative of the functional nature which is different from the intention of a worldly person.
          share|improve this answer

          • Sir, when we talk about cetana, we can say, its characteristic is the state of willing, its function is to accumulate (kamma), and its manifestation is coordination. Its proximate cause is the associated states. (link) Then what is the function of Cetana in a Kriya citta?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 9:06

          • 1

            The function of Kiriya citta is not to accumulate kamma, but to merely carry out a function. Ex: Avajjana citta just performs the function of advertence
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 29 at 9:20

          • Sir, when we study mental factors we study their caracteristic (Lakkhana), their function (Rasa), their manifestation (Paccupatthana), and their proximate cause (Padatthana). I’d like to know the function of Cetana mental factor which appears in a Kiriya citta. It should be definitely different from the Cetana which appears in 81 mundane cittas.
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 4:16

          • @Damith you are repeating the same question 🙂
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 5:25

          • 1

            Cetana is part of every Citta. But Cetana becomes Karma only in Javana Cittas of worldlings. When it comes to Arahaths, Cetana in Javanas do not become Karma as they are indeterminate. In other words, neither wholesome nor unwholesome. So you could say the function of Cetana in Kiriya Cittas is to be non-accumulative(karmically ineffective).
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 11:03

          up vote
          3
          down vote

          accepted

          up vote
          3
          down vote

          accepted

          Cittas are classified in various ways. One such classification is according to their nature. In this classification we have:

          1. Cittas which are resultant states of consciousness, vipaaka, the effects of previous kamma.
          2. Cittas which are causes for action (kamma) through body, speech, or mind. We may call these “causative cittas.” A wholesome citta (kusala citta) will issue in wholesome action and an unwholesome one (akusala citta) in unwholesome action.
          3. Cittas which are neither kamma nor its result. These are called kiriya cittas. They are kammically ineffective, being merely functional. Some kiriya cittas perform simple functions in the process of consciousness, others represent the actions and thoughts of arahants, who no longer generate fresh kamma. Read more here

          Therefore,

          • Statement 1: False
          • Statement 2: False
          • Statement 3: True, but they are called kiriya cittas. The term is indicative of the functional nature which is different from the intention of a worldly person.
          share|improve this answer

          Cittas are classified in various ways. One such classification is according to their nature. In this classification we have:

          1. Cittas which are resultant states of consciousness, vipaaka, the effects of previous kamma.
          2. Cittas which are causes for action (kamma) through body, speech, or mind. We may call these “causative cittas.” A wholesome citta (kusala citta) will issue in wholesome action and an unwholesome one (akusala citta) in unwholesome action.
          3. Cittas which are neither kamma nor its result. These are called kiriya cittas. They are kammically ineffective, being merely functional. Some kiriya cittas perform simple functions in the process of consciousness, others represent the actions and thoughts of arahants, who no longer generate fresh kamma. Read more here

          Therefore,

          • Statement 1: False
          • Statement 2: False
          • Statement 3: True, but they are called kiriya cittas. The term is indicative of the functional nature which is different from the intention of a worldly person.
          share|improve this answer

          share|improve this answer

          share|improve this answer

          edited Nov 29 at 14:17

          answered Nov 29 at 8:39

          Sankha Kulathantille

          23.4k11456

          23.4k11456

          • Sir, when we talk about cetana, we can say, its characteristic is the state of willing, its function is to accumulate (kamma), and its manifestation is coordination. Its proximate cause is the associated states. (link) Then what is the function of Cetana in a Kriya citta?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 9:06

          • 1

            The function of Kiriya citta is not to accumulate kamma, but to merely carry out a function. Ex: Avajjana citta just performs the function of advertence
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 29 at 9:20

          • Sir, when we study mental factors we study their caracteristic (Lakkhana), their function (Rasa), their manifestation (Paccupatthana), and their proximate cause (Padatthana). I’d like to know the function of Cetana mental factor which appears in a Kiriya citta. It should be definitely different from the Cetana which appears in 81 mundane cittas.
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 4:16

          • @Damith you are repeating the same question 🙂
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 5:25

          • 1

            Cetana is part of every Citta. But Cetana becomes Karma only in Javana Cittas of worldlings. When it comes to Arahaths, Cetana in Javanas do not become Karma as they are indeterminate. In other words, neither wholesome nor unwholesome. So you could say the function of Cetana in Kiriya Cittas is to be non-accumulative(karmically ineffective).
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 11:03

          • Sir, when we talk about cetana, we can say, its characteristic is the state of willing, its function is to accumulate (kamma), and its manifestation is coordination. Its proximate cause is the associated states. (link) Then what is the function of Cetana in a Kriya citta?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 9:06

          • 1

            The function of Kiriya citta is not to accumulate kamma, but to merely carry out a function. Ex: Avajjana citta just performs the function of advertence
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 29 at 9:20

          • Sir, when we study mental factors we study their caracteristic (Lakkhana), their function (Rasa), their manifestation (Paccupatthana), and their proximate cause (Padatthana). I’d like to know the function of Cetana mental factor which appears in a Kiriya citta. It should be definitely different from the Cetana which appears in 81 mundane cittas.
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 4:16

          • @Damith you are repeating the same question 🙂
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 5:25

          • 1

            Cetana is part of every Citta. But Cetana becomes Karma only in Javana Cittas of worldlings. When it comes to Arahaths, Cetana in Javanas do not become Karma as they are indeterminate. In other words, neither wholesome nor unwholesome. So you could say the function of Cetana in Kiriya Cittas is to be non-accumulative(karmically ineffective).
            – Sankha Kulathantille
            Nov 30 at 11:03

          Sir, when we talk about cetana, we can say, its characteristic is the state of willing, its function is to accumulate (kamma), and its manifestation is coordination. Its proximate cause is the associated states. (link) Then what is the function of Cetana in a Kriya citta?
          – Damith
          Nov 29 at 9:06

          Sir, when we talk about cetana, we can say, its characteristic is the state of willing, its function is to accumulate (kamma), and its manifestation is coordination. Its proximate cause is the associated states. (link) Then what is the function of Cetana in a Kriya citta?
          – Damith
          Nov 29 at 9:06

          1

          1

          The function of Kiriya citta is not to accumulate kamma, but to merely carry out a function. Ex: Avajjana citta just performs the function of advertence
          – Sankha Kulathantille
          Nov 29 at 9:20

          The function of Kiriya citta is not to accumulate kamma, but to merely carry out a function. Ex: Avajjana citta just performs the function of advertence
          – Sankha Kulathantille
          Nov 29 at 9:20

          Sir, when we study mental factors we study their caracteristic (Lakkhana), their function (Rasa), their manifestation (Paccupatthana), and their proximate cause (Padatthana). I’d like to know the function of Cetana mental factor which appears in a Kiriya citta. It should be definitely different from the Cetana which appears in 81 mundane cittas.
          – Damith
          Nov 30 at 4:16

          Sir, when we study mental factors we study their caracteristic (Lakkhana), their function (Rasa), their manifestation (Paccupatthana), and their proximate cause (Padatthana). I’d like to know the function of Cetana mental factor which appears in a Kiriya citta. It should be definitely different from the Cetana which appears in 81 mundane cittas.
          – Damith
          Nov 30 at 4:16

          @Damith you are repeating the same question 🙂
          – Sankha Kulathantille
          Nov 30 at 5:25

          @Damith you are repeating the same question 🙂
          – Sankha Kulathantille
          Nov 30 at 5:25

          1

          1

          Cetana is part of every Citta. But Cetana becomes Karma only in Javana Cittas of worldlings. When it comes to Arahaths, Cetana in Javanas do not become Karma as they are indeterminate. In other words, neither wholesome nor unwholesome. So you could say the function of Cetana in Kiriya Cittas is to be non-accumulative(karmically ineffective).
          – Sankha Kulathantille
          Nov 30 at 11:03

          Cetana is part of every Citta. But Cetana becomes Karma only in Javana Cittas of worldlings. When it comes to Arahaths, Cetana in Javanas do not become Karma as they are indeterminate. In other words, neither wholesome nor unwholesome. So you could say the function of Cetana in Kiriya Cittas is to be non-accumulative(karmically ineffective).
          – Sankha Kulathantille
          Nov 30 at 11:03

          up vote
          2
          down vote

          The consciousness of an Arahant is ethically indeterminate so he does not accumulate Kamma.

          From The Abhidhamma in Practice —

          For the Arahant, the liberated one, the cittas that
          arise in him can no longer be associated with any unwholesome roots. The cittas that the
          Arahant experiences are neither wholesome nor unwholesome, as he does not generate any
          further kamma; his cittas are exclusively indeterminate.

          and:

          The universals and particulars are, in themselves, ethically indeterminate but become
          wholesome, unwholesome, or neither, depending on the state of consciousness in which they
          occur.

          share|improve this answer

          • Sir, Then the third statement of my question is correct. This leads me to come to a conclusion that, not all cetana (intension) is kamma but depends on the state of consciousness. Am I correct?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 7:22

          • Agree. I see your point. I do not have a satisfactory answer to your question at his stage. -) Perhaps Budha wanted to describe Kamma, not Cetana. Perhaps all Kamma is Cetana but all Cetana is not Kamma.
            – SarathW
            Nov 29 at 8:56

          • @Damith Not every kamma bears fruit. Kamma can be so light or ethically neutral that it doesn’t lead to anything. Think of putting on your shoes, for instance. It’s kamma, but clearly not fruit bearing or ethically relevant.
            – Medhiṇī
            Nov 29 at 9:32

          • @Medhini Millions of consciousness have been originated and dissolved while we are doing a certain thing like putting on our shoes. Do you mean those consciousness altogether is kamma and bears no fruit?
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 3:47

          up vote
          2
          down vote

          The consciousness of an Arahant is ethically indeterminate so he does not accumulate Kamma.

          From The Abhidhamma in Practice —

          For the Arahant, the liberated one, the cittas that
          arise in him can no longer be associated with any unwholesome roots. The cittas that the
          Arahant experiences are neither wholesome nor unwholesome, as he does not generate any
          further kamma; his cittas are exclusively indeterminate.

          and:

          The universals and particulars are, in themselves, ethically indeterminate but become
          wholesome, unwholesome, or neither, depending on the state of consciousness in which they
          occur.

          share|improve this answer

          • Sir, Then the third statement of my question is correct. This leads me to come to a conclusion that, not all cetana (intension) is kamma but depends on the state of consciousness. Am I correct?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 7:22

          • Agree. I see your point. I do not have a satisfactory answer to your question at his stage. -) Perhaps Budha wanted to describe Kamma, not Cetana. Perhaps all Kamma is Cetana but all Cetana is not Kamma.
            – SarathW
            Nov 29 at 8:56

          • @Damith Not every kamma bears fruit. Kamma can be so light or ethically neutral that it doesn’t lead to anything. Think of putting on your shoes, for instance. It’s kamma, but clearly not fruit bearing or ethically relevant.
            – Medhiṇī
            Nov 29 at 9:32

          • @Medhini Millions of consciousness have been originated and dissolved while we are doing a certain thing like putting on our shoes. Do you mean those consciousness altogether is kamma and bears no fruit?
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 3:47

          up vote
          2
          down vote

          up vote
          2
          down vote

          The consciousness of an Arahant is ethically indeterminate so he does not accumulate Kamma.

          From The Abhidhamma in Practice —

          For the Arahant, the liberated one, the cittas that
          arise in him can no longer be associated with any unwholesome roots. The cittas that the
          Arahant experiences are neither wholesome nor unwholesome, as he does not generate any
          further kamma; his cittas are exclusively indeterminate.

          and:

          The universals and particulars are, in themselves, ethically indeterminate but become
          wholesome, unwholesome, or neither, depending on the state of consciousness in which they
          occur.

          share|improve this answer

          The consciousness of an Arahant is ethically indeterminate so he does not accumulate Kamma.

          From The Abhidhamma in Practice —

          For the Arahant, the liberated one, the cittas that
          arise in him can no longer be associated with any unwholesome roots. The cittas that the
          Arahant experiences are neither wholesome nor unwholesome, as he does not generate any
          further kamma; his cittas are exclusively indeterminate.

          and:

          The universals and particulars are, in themselves, ethically indeterminate but become
          wholesome, unwholesome, or neither, depending on the state of consciousness in which they
          occur.

          share|improve this answer

          share|improve this answer

          share|improve this answer

          edited Nov 29 at 8:36

          ChrisW

          28.6k42384

          28.6k42384

          answered Nov 29 at 7:04

          SarathW

          2,366212

          2,366212

          • Sir, Then the third statement of my question is correct. This leads me to come to a conclusion that, not all cetana (intension) is kamma but depends on the state of consciousness. Am I correct?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 7:22

          • Agree. I see your point. I do not have a satisfactory answer to your question at his stage. -) Perhaps Budha wanted to describe Kamma, not Cetana. Perhaps all Kamma is Cetana but all Cetana is not Kamma.
            – SarathW
            Nov 29 at 8:56

          • @Damith Not every kamma bears fruit. Kamma can be so light or ethically neutral that it doesn’t lead to anything. Think of putting on your shoes, for instance. It’s kamma, but clearly not fruit bearing or ethically relevant.
            – Medhiṇī
            Nov 29 at 9:32

          • @Medhini Millions of consciousness have been originated and dissolved while we are doing a certain thing like putting on our shoes. Do you mean those consciousness altogether is kamma and bears no fruit?
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 3:47

          • Sir, Then the third statement of my question is correct. This leads me to come to a conclusion that, not all cetana (intension) is kamma but depends on the state of consciousness. Am I correct?
            – Damith
            Nov 29 at 7:22

          • Agree. I see your point. I do not have a satisfactory answer to your question at his stage. -) Perhaps Budha wanted to describe Kamma, not Cetana. Perhaps all Kamma is Cetana but all Cetana is not Kamma.
            – SarathW
            Nov 29 at 8:56

          • @Damith Not every kamma bears fruit. Kamma can be so light or ethically neutral that it doesn’t lead to anything. Think of putting on your shoes, for instance. It’s kamma, but clearly not fruit bearing or ethically relevant.
            – Medhiṇī
            Nov 29 at 9:32

          • @Medhini Millions of consciousness have been originated and dissolved while we are doing a certain thing like putting on our shoes. Do you mean those consciousness altogether is kamma and bears no fruit?
            – Damith
            Nov 30 at 3:47

          Sir, Then the third statement of my question is correct. This leads me to come to a conclusion that, not all cetana (intension) is kamma but depends on the state of consciousness. Am I correct?
          – Damith
          Nov 29 at 7:22

          Sir, Then the third statement of my question is correct. This leads me to come to a conclusion that, not all cetana (intension) is kamma but depends on the state of consciousness. Am I correct?
          – Damith
          Nov 29 at 7:22

          Agree. I see your point. I do not have a satisfactory answer to your question at his stage. -) Perhaps Budha wanted to describe Kamma, not Cetana. Perhaps all Kamma is Cetana but all Cetana is not Kamma.
          – SarathW
          Nov 29 at 8:56

          Agree. I see your point. I do not have a satisfactory answer to your question at his stage. -) Perhaps Budha wanted to describe Kamma, not Cetana. Perhaps all Kamma is Cetana but all Cetana is not Kamma.
          – SarathW
          Nov 29 at 8:56

          @Damith Not every kamma bears fruit. Kamma can be so light or ethically neutral that it doesn’t lead to anything. Think of putting on your shoes, for instance. It’s kamma, but clearly not fruit bearing or ethically relevant.
          – Medhiṇī
          Nov 29 at 9:32

          @Damith Not every kamma bears fruit. Kamma can be so light or ethically neutral that it doesn’t lead to anything. Think of putting on your shoes, for instance. It’s kamma, but clearly not fruit bearing or ethically relevant.
          – Medhiṇī
          Nov 29 at 9:32

          @Medhini Millions of consciousness have been originated and dissolved while we are doing a certain thing like putting on our shoes. Do you mean those consciousness altogether is kamma and bears no fruit?
          – Damith
          Nov 30 at 3:47

          @Medhini Millions of consciousness have been originated and dissolved while we are doing a certain thing like putting on our shoes. Do you mean those consciousness altogether is kamma and bears no fruit?
          – Damith
          Nov 30 at 3:47

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