How to enable all users to access arduino card?

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I am trying to set up Linux (Debian 9) machines in a computer lab to let users plug in their arduino interface and flash their device with their code.

I do not really know about arduino and so on, and my arduino users do not know about linux. I also have never really done things with udev.

I am inspecting the script in the arduino IDE distro. It creates udev rules which I think are aimed at populating /dev with devices when a range of arduino-compatible interfaces are plugged in.

The devices belong to specific user groups and the scripts adds the current user to said groups to make things work. Now, I need all people who use these machines to be able to use arduino, but I do not want to add them all to the groups (this would require changing the ldap config which is out of my realm).

I am tempted to tweak the udev rules in the scripts to set the devices to mode 666 instead of 660.

Is this a reasonable way to achieve what I want ?

(also, if you think letting all users have access is a terrible idea, please say so and explain ; I assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong)

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  • Not super helpful to your question, but wanted to highlight “assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong”…… Arduino’s have writable memory (as do some modern keyboards and mice). This “could” introduce risk, but I wouldn’t think your situation necessitates going overboard. Just wanted to point this out 🙂
    – bgregs
    Nov 28 at 21:54

  • Thanks for the remark. Inhowfar would this introduce a risk (anymore than allowing the use of USB storage devices) ?
    – ysalmon
    Nov 28 at 22:06

  • 1

    I wouldn’t think the risk would be any greater than allowing standard USB flash drives. My previous employer used to limit ANY USB storage device on company laptops and it made for a very painful work environment. There are pros and cons to both approaches, but it is up to you to decide what is best for your situation 🙂
    – bgregs
    Nov 30 at 21:28

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

I am trying to set up Linux (Debian 9) machines in a computer lab to let users plug in their arduino interface and flash their device with their code.

I do not really know about arduino and so on, and my arduino users do not know about linux. I also have never really done things with udev.

I am inspecting the script in the arduino IDE distro. It creates udev rules which I think are aimed at populating /dev with devices when a range of arduino-compatible interfaces are plugged in.

The devices belong to specific user groups and the scripts adds the current user to said groups to make things work. Now, I need all people who use these machines to be able to use arduino, but I do not want to add them all to the groups (this would require changing the ldap config which is out of my realm).

I am tempted to tweak the udev rules in the scripts to set the devices to mode 666 instead of 660.

Is this a reasonable way to achieve what I want ?

(also, if you think letting all users have access is a terrible idea, please say so and explain ; I assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong)

share|improve this question

  • Not super helpful to your question, but wanted to highlight “assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong”…… Arduino’s have writable memory (as do some modern keyboards and mice). This “could” introduce risk, but I wouldn’t think your situation necessitates going overboard. Just wanted to point this out 🙂
    – bgregs
    Nov 28 at 21:54

  • Thanks for the remark. Inhowfar would this introduce a risk (anymore than allowing the use of USB storage devices) ?
    – ysalmon
    Nov 28 at 22:06

  • 1

    I wouldn’t think the risk would be any greater than allowing standard USB flash drives. My previous employer used to limit ANY USB storage device on company laptops and it made for a very painful work environment. There are pros and cons to both approaches, but it is up to you to decide what is best for your situation 🙂
    – bgregs
    Nov 30 at 21:28

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

I am trying to set up Linux (Debian 9) machines in a computer lab to let users plug in their arduino interface and flash their device with their code.

I do not really know about arduino and so on, and my arduino users do not know about linux. I also have never really done things with udev.

I am inspecting the script in the arduino IDE distro. It creates udev rules which I think are aimed at populating /dev with devices when a range of arduino-compatible interfaces are plugged in.

The devices belong to specific user groups and the scripts adds the current user to said groups to make things work. Now, I need all people who use these machines to be able to use arduino, but I do not want to add them all to the groups (this would require changing the ldap config which is out of my realm).

I am tempted to tweak the udev rules in the scripts to set the devices to mode 666 instead of 660.

Is this a reasonable way to achieve what I want ?

(also, if you think letting all users have access is a terrible idea, please say so and explain ; I assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong)

share|improve this question

I am trying to set up Linux (Debian 9) machines in a computer lab to let users plug in their arduino interface and flash their device with their code.

I do not really know about arduino and so on, and my arduino users do not know about linux. I also have never really done things with udev.

I am inspecting the script in the arduino IDE distro. It creates udev rules which I think are aimed at populating /dev with devices when a range of arduino-compatible interfaces are plugged in.

The devices belong to specific user groups and the scripts adds the current user to said groups to make things work. Now, I need all people who use these machines to be able to use arduino, but I do not want to add them all to the groups (this would require changing the ldap config which is out of my realm).

I am tempted to tweak the udev rules in the scripts to set the devices to mode 666 instead of 660.

Is this a reasonable way to achieve what I want ?

(also, if you think letting all users have access is a terrible idea, please say so and explain ; I assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong)

udev devices arduino

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asked Nov 28 at 21:45

ysalmon

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  • Not super helpful to your question, but wanted to highlight “assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong”…… Arduino’s have writable memory (as do some modern keyboards and mice). This “could” introduce risk, but I wouldn’t think your situation necessitates going overboard. Just wanted to point this out 🙂
    – bgregs
    Nov 28 at 21:54

  • Thanks for the remark. Inhowfar would this introduce a risk (anymore than allowing the use of USB storage devices) ?
    – ysalmon
    Nov 28 at 22:06

  • 1

    I wouldn’t think the risk would be any greater than allowing standard USB flash drives. My previous employer used to limit ANY USB storage device on company laptops and it made for a very painful work environment. There are pros and cons to both approaches, but it is up to you to decide what is best for your situation 🙂
    – bgregs
    Nov 30 at 21:28

  • Not super helpful to your question, but wanted to highlight “assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong”…… Arduino’s have writable memory (as do some modern keyboards and mice). This “could” introduce risk, but I wouldn’t think your situation necessitates going overboard. Just wanted to point this out 🙂
    – bgregs
    Nov 28 at 21:54

  • Thanks for the remark. Inhowfar would this introduce a risk (anymore than allowing the use of USB storage devices) ?
    – ysalmon
    Nov 28 at 22:06

  • 1

    I wouldn’t think the risk would be any greater than allowing standard USB flash drives. My previous employer used to limit ANY USB storage device on company laptops and it made for a very painful work environment. There are pros and cons to both approaches, but it is up to you to decide what is best for your situation 🙂
    – bgregs
    Nov 30 at 21:28

Not super helpful to your question, but wanted to highlight “assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong”…… Arduino’s have writable memory (as do some modern keyboards and mice). This “could” introduce risk, but I wouldn’t think your situation necessitates going overboard. Just wanted to point this out 🙂
– bgregs
Nov 28 at 21:54

Not super helpful to your question, but wanted to highlight “assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong”…… Arduino’s have writable memory (as do some modern keyboards and mice). This “could” introduce risk, but I wouldn’t think your situation necessitates going overboard. Just wanted to point this out 🙂
– bgregs
Nov 28 at 21:54

Thanks for the remark. Inhowfar would this introduce a risk (anymore than allowing the use of USB storage devices) ?
– ysalmon
Nov 28 at 22:06

Thanks for the remark. Inhowfar would this introduce a risk (anymore than allowing the use of USB storage devices) ?
– ysalmon
Nov 28 at 22:06

1

1

I wouldn’t think the risk would be any greater than allowing standard USB flash drives. My previous employer used to limit ANY USB storage device on company laptops and it made for a very painful work environment. There are pros and cons to both approaches, but it is up to you to decide what is best for your situation 🙂
– bgregs
Nov 30 at 21:28

I wouldn’t think the risk would be any greater than allowing standard USB flash drives. My previous employer used to limit ANY USB storage device on company laptops and it made for a very painful work environment. There are pros and cons to both approaches, but it is up to you to decide what is best for your situation 🙂
– bgregs
Nov 30 at 21:28

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