Linux Mint Slow boot time [closed]

The name of the pictureThe name of the pictureThe name of the pictureClash Royale CLAN TAG#URR8PPP

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

I’m using Linux Mint OS. my laptop was booting very fast when i installed mint. but now after about 1 week of usage its taking long time to boot up my laptop.

Can you give any suggestion to get back my boot up speed?

here is my

systemd-analyze blame

     20.274s systemd-journal-flush.service
     17.938s dev-sda2.device
     11.544s keyboard-setup.service
     11.365s systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
      9.939s systemd-sysctl.service
      7.188s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
      7.085s networkd-dispatcher.service
      6.852s snapd.service
      5.742s ubuntu-system-adjustments.service
      5.347s NetworkManager.service
      3.615s udisks2.service
      2.468s thermald.service
      2.136s gpu-manager.service
      2.066s systemd-random-seed.service
      2.048s ModemManager.service
      1.981s accounts-daemon.service
      1.768s dev-loop2.device
      1.412s systemd-modules-load.service
      1.345s systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
      1.128s avahi-daemon.service
      1.043s dev-loop1.device
      1.040s dev-loop0.device
      1.034s grub-common.service
       717ms apparmor.service
       706ms wpa_supplicant.service
       699ms lightdm.service
       695ms plymouth-quit-wait.service
       568ms systemd-udevd.service
       531ms dns-clean.service
       528ms swapfile.swap
       495ms speech-dispatcher.service
       485ms pppd-dns.service
       481ms lm-sensors.service
       450ms iio-sensor-proxy.service
       450ms systemd-logind.service
       439ms polkit.service
       384ms systemd-remount-fs.service
       352ms networking.service
       349ms ufw.service
       325ms systemd-journald.service
       312ms packagekit.service
       276ms blk-availability.service
       263ms systemd-resolved.service
       263ms qemu-kvm.service
       261ms plymouth-read-write.service
       249ms rsyslog.service
       249ms systemd-update-utmp.service
       231ms virtualbox.service
       212ms systemd-timesyncd.service
       211ms systemd-fsck@dev-disk-byx2duuid-729Bx2d4E51.service
       200ms boot-efi.mount
       200ms dev-hugepages.mount
       197ms upower.service
       195ms snap-core-5897.mount
       170ms systemd-backlight@backlight:intel_backlight.service
       145ms kmod-static-nodes.service
       118ms setvtrgb.service
        96ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
        91ms user@1000.service
        90ms sys-kernel-debug.mount
        83ms dev-mqueue.mount
        67ms colord.service
        59ms apport.service
        48ms snap-core-5742.mount
        38ms snap-anbox-158.mount
        36ms alsa-restore.service
        35ms snapd.seeded.service
        32ms hddtemp.service
        23ms plymouth-start.service
        22ms kerneloops.service
        19ms snapd.socket
        15ms motd-news.service
        10ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
         9ms systemd-rfkill.service
         9ms ureadahead-stop.service
         8ms console-setup.service
         7ms rtkit-daemon.service
         5ms systemd-user-sessions.service
         5ms sys-fs-fuse-connections.mount
         4ms sys-kernel-config.mount
         3ms openvpn.service

will be useful to disable some of these services?

here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question

~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s
(loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s
graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by Ipor Sircer, Romeo Ninov, Christopher, Stephen Kitt, Jesse_b Nov 29 at 16:02

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Could you please update your posts with the results of systemd-analyze? This will give a more accurate account of the boot time. We cannot know what services you need or do not need. Once we know how long the actual boot takes, edit your /etc/defaults/grub at the line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" save the file and run update-grub reboot and see if there is a stopped job running or an erroneous disk being looked for etc, etc.
    – kemotep
    Nov 29 at 14:40

  • That’s a longgg time for systemd-journal-flush. What are the settings in your journald.conf? Possibly limit the size of your journal?
    – bgregs
    Nov 29 at 14:42

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

I’m using Linux Mint OS. my laptop was booting very fast when i installed mint. but now after about 1 week of usage its taking long time to boot up my laptop.

Can you give any suggestion to get back my boot up speed?

here is my

systemd-analyze blame

     20.274s systemd-journal-flush.service
     17.938s dev-sda2.device
     11.544s keyboard-setup.service
     11.365s systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
      9.939s systemd-sysctl.service
      7.188s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
      7.085s networkd-dispatcher.service
      6.852s snapd.service
      5.742s ubuntu-system-adjustments.service
      5.347s NetworkManager.service
      3.615s udisks2.service
      2.468s thermald.service
      2.136s gpu-manager.service
      2.066s systemd-random-seed.service
      2.048s ModemManager.service
      1.981s accounts-daemon.service
      1.768s dev-loop2.device
      1.412s systemd-modules-load.service
      1.345s systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
      1.128s avahi-daemon.service
      1.043s dev-loop1.device
      1.040s dev-loop0.device
      1.034s grub-common.service
       717ms apparmor.service
       706ms wpa_supplicant.service
       699ms lightdm.service
       695ms plymouth-quit-wait.service
       568ms systemd-udevd.service
       531ms dns-clean.service
       528ms swapfile.swap
       495ms speech-dispatcher.service
       485ms pppd-dns.service
       481ms lm-sensors.service
       450ms iio-sensor-proxy.service
       450ms systemd-logind.service
       439ms polkit.service
       384ms systemd-remount-fs.service
       352ms networking.service
       349ms ufw.service
       325ms systemd-journald.service
       312ms packagekit.service
       276ms blk-availability.service
       263ms systemd-resolved.service
       263ms qemu-kvm.service
       261ms plymouth-read-write.service
       249ms rsyslog.service
       249ms systemd-update-utmp.service
       231ms virtualbox.service
       212ms systemd-timesyncd.service
       211ms systemd-fsck@dev-disk-byx2duuid-729Bx2d4E51.service
       200ms boot-efi.mount
       200ms dev-hugepages.mount
       197ms upower.service
       195ms snap-core-5897.mount
       170ms systemd-backlight@backlight:intel_backlight.service
       145ms kmod-static-nodes.service
       118ms setvtrgb.service
        96ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
        91ms user@1000.service
        90ms sys-kernel-debug.mount
        83ms dev-mqueue.mount
        67ms colord.service
        59ms apport.service
        48ms snap-core-5742.mount
        38ms snap-anbox-158.mount
        36ms alsa-restore.service
        35ms snapd.seeded.service
        32ms hddtemp.service
        23ms plymouth-start.service
        22ms kerneloops.service
        19ms snapd.socket
        15ms motd-news.service
        10ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
         9ms systemd-rfkill.service
         9ms ureadahead-stop.service
         8ms console-setup.service
         7ms rtkit-daemon.service
         5ms systemd-user-sessions.service
         5ms sys-fs-fuse-connections.mount
         4ms sys-kernel-config.mount
         3ms openvpn.service

will be useful to disable some of these services?

here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question

~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s
(loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s
graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by Ipor Sircer, Romeo Ninov, Christopher, Stephen Kitt, Jesse_b Nov 29 at 16:02

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Could you please update your posts with the results of systemd-analyze? This will give a more accurate account of the boot time. We cannot know what services you need or do not need. Once we know how long the actual boot takes, edit your /etc/defaults/grub at the line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" save the file and run update-grub reboot and see if there is a stopped job running or an erroneous disk being looked for etc, etc.
    – kemotep
    Nov 29 at 14:40

  • That’s a longgg time for systemd-journal-flush. What are the settings in your journald.conf? Possibly limit the size of your journal?
    – bgregs
    Nov 29 at 14:42

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

I’m using Linux Mint OS. my laptop was booting very fast when i installed mint. but now after about 1 week of usage its taking long time to boot up my laptop.

Can you give any suggestion to get back my boot up speed?

here is my

systemd-analyze blame

     20.274s systemd-journal-flush.service
     17.938s dev-sda2.device
     11.544s keyboard-setup.service
     11.365s systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
      9.939s systemd-sysctl.service
      7.188s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
      7.085s networkd-dispatcher.service
      6.852s snapd.service
      5.742s ubuntu-system-adjustments.service
      5.347s NetworkManager.service
      3.615s udisks2.service
      2.468s thermald.service
      2.136s gpu-manager.service
      2.066s systemd-random-seed.service
      2.048s ModemManager.service
      1.981s accounts-daemon.service
      1.768s dev-loop2.device
      1.412s systemd-modules-load.service
      1.345s systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
      1.128s avahi-daemon.service
      1.043s dev-loop1.device
      1.040s dev-loop0.device
      1.034s grub-common.service
       717ms apparmor.service
       706ms wpa_supplicant.service
       699ms lightdm.service
       695ms plymouth-quit-wait.service
       568ms systemd-udevd.service
       531ms dns-clean.service
       528ms swapfile.swap
       495ms speech-dispatcher.service
       485ms pppd-dns.service
       481ms lm-sensors.service
       450ms iio-sensor-proxy.service
       450ms systemd-logind.service
       439ms polkit.service
       384ms systemd-remount-fs.service
       352ms networking.service
       349ms ufw.service
       325ms systemd-journald.service
       312ms packagekit.service
       276ms blk-availability.service
       263ms systemd-resolved.service
       263ms qemu-kvm.service
       261ms plymouth-read-write.service
       249ms rsyslog.service
       249ms systemd-update-utmp.service
       231ms virtualbox.service
       212ms systemd-timesyncd.service
       211ms systemd-fsck@dev-disk-byx2duuid-729Bx2d4E51.service
       200ms boot-efi.mount
       200ms dev-hugepages.mount
       197ms upower.service
       195ms snap-core-5897.mount
       170ms systemd-backlight@backlight:intel_backlight.service
       145ms kmod-static-nodes.service
       118ms setvtrgb.service
        96ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
        91ms user@1000.service
        90ms sys-kernel-debug.mount
        83ms dev-mqueue.mount
        67ms colord.service
        59ms apport.service
        48ms snap-core-5742.mount
        38ms snap-anbox-158.mount
        36ms alsa-restore.service
        35ms snapd.seeded.service
        32ms hddtemp.service
        23ms plymouth-start.service
        22ms kerneloops.service
        19ms snapd.socket
        15ms motd-news.service
        10ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
         9ms systemd-rfkill.service
         9ms ureadahead-stop.service
         8ms console-setup.service
         7ms rtkit-daemon.service
         5ms systemd-user-sessions.service
         5ms sys-fs-fuse-connections.mount
         4ms sys-kernel-config.mount
         3ms openvpn.service

will be useful to disable some of these services?

here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question

~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s
(loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s
graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace

share|improve this question

I’m using Linux Mint OS. my laptop was booting very fast when i installed mint. but now after about 1 week of usage its taking long time to boot up my laptop.

Can you give any suggestion to get back my boot up speed?

here is my

systemd-analyze blame

     20.274s systemd-journal-flush.service
     17.938s dev-sda2.device
     11.544s keyboard-setup.service
     11.365s systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
      9.939s systemd-sysctl.service
      7.188s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
      7.085s networkd-dispatcher.service
      6.852s snapd.service
      5.742s ubuntu-system-adjustments.service
      5.347s NetworkManager.service
      3.615s udisks2.service
      2.468s thermald.service
      2.136s gpu-manager.service
      2.066s systemd-random-seed.service
      2.048s ModemManager.service
      1.981s accounts-daemon.service
      1.768s dev-loop2.device
      1.412s systemd-modules-load.service
      1.345s systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
      1.128s avahi-daemon.service
      1.043s dev-loop1.device
      1.040s dev-loop0.device
      1.034s grub-common.service
       717ms apparmor.service
       706ms wpa_supplicant.service
       699ms lightdm.service
       695ms plymouth-quit-wait.service
       568ms systemd-udevd.service
       531ms dns-clean.service
       528ms swapfile.swap
       495ms speech-dispatcher.service
       485ms pppd-dns.service
       481ms lm-sensors.service
       450ms iio-sensor-proxy.service
       450ms systemd-logind.service
       439ms polkit.service
       384ms systemd-remount-fs.service
       352ms networking.service
       349ms ufw.service
       325ms systemd-journald.service
       312ms packagekit.service
       276ms blk-availability.service
       263ms systemd-resolved.service
       263ms qemu-kvm.service
       261ms plymouth-read-write.service
       249ms rsyslog.service
       249ms systemd-update-utmp.service
       231ms virtualbox.service
       212ms systemd-timesyncd.service
       211ms systemd-fsck@dev-disk-byx2duuid-729Bx2d4E51.service
       200ms boot-efi.mount
       200ms dev-hugepages.mount
       197ms upower.service
       195ms snap-core-5897.mount
       170ms systemd-backlight@backlight:intel_backlight.service
       145ms kmod-static-nodes.service
       118ms setvtrgb.service
        96ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
        91ms user@1000.service
        90ms sys-kernel-debug.mount
        83ms dev-mqueue.mount
        67ms colord.service
        59ms apport.service
        48ms snap-core-5742.mount
        38ms snap-anbox-158.mount
        36ms alsa-restore.service
        35ms snapd.seeded.service
        32ms hddtemp.service
        23ms plymouth-start.service
        22ms kerneloops.service
        19ms snapd.socket
        15ms motd-news.service
        10ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
         9ms systemd-rfkill.service
         9ms ureadahead-stop.service
         8ms console-setup.service
         7ms rtkit-daemon.service
         5ms systemd-user-sessions.service
         5ms sys-fs-fuse-connections.mount
         4ms sys-kernel-config.mount
         3ms openvpn.service

will be useful to disable some of these services?

here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question

~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s
(loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s
graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace

linux-mint

share|improve this question

share|improve this question

share|improve this question

share|improve this question

edited Nov 29 at 16:48

Jesse_b

11.5k23063

11.5k23063

asked Nov 29 at 14:24

SamSeen

61

61

closed as too broad by Ipor Sircer, Romeo Ninov, Christopher, Stephen Kitt, Jesse_b Nov 29 at 16:02

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

closed as too broad by Ipor Sircer, Romeo Ninov, Christopher, Stephen Kitt, Jesse_b Nov 29 at 16:02

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Could you please update your posts with the results of systemd-analyze? This will give a more accurate account of the boot time. We cannot know what services you need or do not need. Once we know how long the actual boot takes, edit your /etc/defaults/grub at the line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" save the file and run update-grub reboot and see if there is a stopped job running or an erroneous disk being looked for etc, etc.
    – kemotep
    Nov 29 at 14:40

  • That’s a longgg time for systemd-journal-flush. What are the settings in your journald.conf? Possibly limit the size of your journal?
    – bgregs
    Nov 29 at 14:42

  • Could you please update your posts with the results of systemd-analyze? This will give a more accurate account of the boot time. We cannot know what services you need or do not need. Once we know how long the actual boot takes, edit your /etc/defaults/grub at the line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" save the file and run update-grub reboot and see if there is a stopped job running or an erroneous disk being looked for etc, etc.
    – kemotep
    Nov 29 at 14:40

  • That’s a longgg time for systemd-journal-flush. What are the settings in your journald.conf? Possibly limit the size of your journal?
    – bgregs
    Nov 29 at 14:42

Could you please update your posts with the results of systemd-analyze? This will give a more accurate account of the boot time. We cannot know what services you need or do not need. Once we know how long the actual boot takes, edit your /etc/defaults/grub at the line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" save the file and run update-grub reboot and see if there is a stopped job running or an erroneous disk being looked for etc, etc.
– kemotep
Nov 29 at 14:40

Could you please update your posts with the results of systemd-analyze? This will give a more accurate account of the boot time. We cannot know what services you need or do not need. Once we know how long the actual boot takes, edit your /etc/defaults/grub at the line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" save the file and run update-grub reboot and see if there is a stopped job running or an erroneous disk being looked for etc, etc.
– kemotep
Nov 29 at 14:40

That’s a longgg time for systemd-journal-flush. What are the settings in your journald.conf? Possibly limit the size of your journal?
– bgregs
Nov 29 at 14:42

That’s a longgg time for systemd-journal-flush. What are the settings in your journald.conf? Possibly limit the size of your journal?
– bgregs
Nov 29 at 14:42

1 Answer
1

active

oldest

votes

up vote
0
down vote

I would change this:

sudo journalctl --vacuum-time=5d

This will set your computer to only keep logs for 5 days.

You could also use a smaller time, but be reasonable. That way there is less to flush when it has to.
If you don’t use text to speech or any of that, disable those I see that they are loaded as well.

share|improve this answer

  • here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question ~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s (loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace
    – SamSeen
    Nov 29 at 16:22

  • Yea, that userspace number seems a little high. Consider though, are you using the proprietary graphics drivers? Or are they opensource ones?
    – Michael Prokopec
    Nov 29 at 16:48

1 Answer
1

active

oldest

votes

1 Answer
1

active

oldest

votes

active

oldest

votes

active

oldest

votes

up vote
0
down vote

I would change this:

sudo journalctl --vacuum-time=5d

This will set your computer to only keep logs for 5 days.

You could also use a smaller time, but be reasonable. That way there is less to flush when it has to.
If you don’t use text to speech or any of that, disable those I see that they are loaded as well.

share|improve this answer

  • here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question ~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s (loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace
    – SamSeen
    Nov 29 at 16:22

  • Yea, that userspace number seems a little high. Consider though, are you using the proprietary graphics drivers? Or are they opensource ones?
    – Michael Prokopec
    Nov 29 at 16:48

up vote
0
down vote

I would change this:

sudo journalctl --vacuum-time=5d

This will set your computer to only keep logs for 5 days.

You could also use a smaller time, but be reasonable. That way there is less to flush when it has to.
If you don’t use text to speech or any of that, disable those I see that they are loaded as well.

share|improve this answer

  • here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question ~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s (loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace
    – SamSeen
    Nov 29 at 16:22

  • Yea, that userspace number seems a little high. Consider though, are you using the proprietary graphics drivers? Or are they opensource ones?
    – Michael Prokopec
    Nov 29 at 16:48

up vote
0
down vote

up vote
0
down vote

I would change this:

sudo journalctl --vacuum-time=5d

This will set your computer to only keep logs for 5 days.

You could also use a smaller time, but be reasonable. That way there is less to flush when it has to.
If you don’t use text to speech or any of that, disable those I see that they are loaded as well.

share|improve this answer

I would change this:

sudo journalctl --vacuum-time=5d

This will set your computer to only keep logs for 5 days.

You could also use a smaller time, but be reasonable. That way there is less to flush when it has to.
If you don’t use text to speech or any of that, disable those I see that they are loaded as well.

share|improve this answer

share|improve this answer

share|improve this answer

answered Nov 29 at 15:46

Michael Prokopec

76916

76916

  • here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question ~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s (loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace
    – SamSeen
    Nov 29 at 16:22

  • Yea, that userspace number seems a little high. Consider though, are you using the proprietary graphics drivers? Or are they opensource ones?
    – Michael Prokopec
    Nov 29 at 16:48

  • here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question ~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s (loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace
    – SamSeen
    Nov 29 at 16:22

  • Yea, that userspace number seems a little high. Consider though, are you using the proprietary graphics drivers? Or are they opensource ones?
    – Michael Prokopec
    Nov 29 at 16:48

here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question ~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s (loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace
– SamSeen
Nov 29 at 16:22

here is the result for @kemotep ‘s question ~$ systemd-analyze Startup finished in 3.031s (firmware) + 11.544s (loader) + 6.210s (kernel) + 40.449s (userspace) = 1min 1.236s graphical.target reached after 40.439s in userspace
– SamSeen
Nov 29 at 16:22

Yea, that userspace number seems a little high. Consider though, are you using the proprietary graphics drivers? Or are they opensource ones?
– Michael Prokopec
Nov 29 at 16:48

Yea, that userspace number seems a little high. Consider though, are you using the proprietary graphics drivers? Or are they opensource ones?
– Michael Prokopec
Nov 29 at 16:48

Related Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *