process name from ps command show ? instead of _ (question mark instead of underscore)

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I have a specific linux CentOS 6 machine,
The processes I execute are:
test_statd, test_watch.

When i execute the follwing:

ps -eo comm | grep test_

I dont get response, so i execute this:

ps -eo comm | grep test

Now i get response, i see my proccesses, but they appear as:

test?statd
test?watch

instead of:
test_statd
test_watch

What is the reason _ was converted to ? as the process name.

This is the output of command ps -eo..

Thanks

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  • 2

    Processes with underscores show up fine here; you tagged ‘locale’ — does the behavior change with LC_ALL=C ps ... ?
    – Jeff Schaller
    Nov 28 at 19:54

  • From man grep on my CentOS 6.9 machine, the -w flag states it will only match if the match forms a whole word. A character is part of a word if it’s a letter, digit, or underscore. From that, I would assume neither test nor test_ should match test_statd if you pass the -w flag. Are you sure the output of your ps command really contains an underscore? The question mark reminds me of ls‘s behavior when a filename contains an irregular character. If it’s not an underscore, that would explain why grep -w test yields a match.
    – Kevin Kruse
    Nov 28 at 20:00

  • @KevinKruse removed -w. thats not the issue, sorry for that. thanks
    – ilansch
    Nov 28 at 20:02

  • @JeffSchaller i am not familiar with the locale in linux, all my labs are usually english, this is a situation happend on a customer machine, I am trying to reproduce, i changed the locale in my lab from en_US to fr_BE, LC_ALL= is empty on locale output.
    – ilansch
    Nov 28 at 20:03

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

I have a specific linux CentOS 6 machine,
The processes I execute are:
test_statd, test_watch.

When i execute the follwing:

ps -eo comm | grep test_

I dont get response, so i execute this:

ps -eo comm | grep test

Now i get response, i see my proccesses, but they appear as:

test?statd
test?watch

instead of:
test_statd
test_watch

What is the reason _ was converted to ? as the process name.

This is the output of command ps -eo..

Thanks

share|improve this question

  • 2

    Processes with underscores show up fine here; you tagged ‘locale’ — does the behavior change with LC_ALL=C ps ... ?
    – Jeff Schaller
    Nov 28 at 19:54

  • From man grep on my CentOS 6.9 machine, the -w flag states it will only match if the match forms a whole word. A character is part of a word if it’s a letter, digit, or underscore. From that, I would assume neither test nor test_ should match test_statd if you pass the -w flag. Are you sure the output of your ps command really contains an underscore? The question mark reminds me of ls‘s behavior when a filename contains an irregular character. If it’s not an underscore, that would explain why grep -w test yields a match.
    – Kevin Kruse
    Nov 28 at 20:00

  • @KevinKruse removed -w. thats not the issue, sorry for that. thanks
    – ilansch
    Nov 28 at 20:02

  • @JeffSchaller i am not familiar with the locale in linux, all my labs are usually english, this is a situation happend on a customer machine, I am trying to reproduce, i changed the locale in my lab from en_US to fr_BE, LC_ALL= is empty on locale output.
    – ilansch
    Nov 28 at 20:03

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

up vote
0
down vote

favorite

I have a specific linux CentOS 6 machine,
The processes I execute are:
test_statd, test_watch.

When i execute the follwing:

ps -eo comm | grep test_

I dont get response, so i execute this:

ps -eo comm | grep test

Now i get response, i see my proccesses, but they appear as:

test?statd
test?watch

instead of:
test_statd
test_watch

What is the reason _ was converted to ? as the process name.

This is the output of command ps -eo..

Thanks

share|improve this question

I have a specific linux CentOS 6 machine,
The processes I execute are:
test_statd, test_watch.

When i execute the follwing:

ps -eo comm | grep test_

I dont get response, so i execute this:

ps -eo comm | grep test

Now i get response, i see my proccesses, but they appear as:

test?statd
test?watch

instead of:
test_statd
test_watch

What is the reason _ was converted to ? as the process name.

This is the output of command ps -eo..

Thanks

linux process locale

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share|improve this question

edited Nov 28 at 20:02

asked Nov 28 at 19:44

ilansch

1481111

1481111

  • 2

    Processes with underscores show up fine here; you tagged ‘locale’ — does the behavior change with LC_ALL=C ps ... ?
    – Jeff Schaller
    Nov 28 at 19:54

  • From man grep on my CentOS 6.9 machine, the -w flag states it will only match if the match forms a whole word. A character is part of a word if it’s a letter, digit, or underscore. From that, I would assume neither test nor test_ should match test_statd if you pass the -w flag. Are you sure the output of your ps command really contains an underscore? The question mark reminds me of ls‘s behavior when a filename contains an irregular character. If it’s not an underscore, that would explain why grep -w test yields a match.
    – Kevin Kruse
    Nov 28 at 20:00

  • @KevinKruse removed -w. thats not the issue, sorry for that. thanks
    – ilansch
    Nov 28 at 20:02

  • @JeffSchaller i am not familiar with the locale in linux, all my labs are usually english, this is a situation happend on a customer machine, I am trying to reproduce, i changed the locale in my lab from en_US to fr_BE, LC_ALL= is empty on locale output.
    – ilansch
    Nov 28 at 20:03

  • 2

    Processes with underscores show up fine here; you tagged ‘locale’ — does the behavior change with LC_ALL=C ps ... ?
    – Jeff Schaller
    Nov 28 at 19:54

  • From man grep on my CentOS 6.9 machine, the -w flag states it will only match if the match forms a whole word. A character is part of a word if it’s a letter, digit, or underscore. From that, I would assume neither test nor test_ should match test_statd if you pass the -w flag. Are you sure the output of your ps command really contains an underscore? The question mark reminds me of ls‘s behavior when a filename contains an irregular character. If it’s not an underscore, that would explain why grep -w test yields a match.
    – Kevin Kruse
    Nov 28 at 20:00

  • @KevinKruse removed -w. thats not the issue, sorry for that. thanks
    – ilansch
    Nov 28 at 20:02

  • @JeffSchaller i am not familiar with the locale in linux, all my labs are usually english, this is a situation happend on a customer machine, I am trying to reproduce, i changed the locale in my lab from en_US to fr_BE, LC_ALL= is empty on locale output.
    – ilansch
    Nov 28 at 20:03

2

2

Processes with underscores show up fine here; you tagged ‘locale’ — does the behavior change with LC_ALL=C ps ... ?
– Jeff Schaller
Nov 28 at 19:54

Processes with underscores show up fine here; you tagged ‘locale’ — does the behavior change with LC_ALL=C ps ... ?
– Jeff Schaller
Nov 28 at 19:54

From man grep on my CentOS 6.9 machine, the -w flag states it will only match if the match forms a whole word. A character is part of a word if it’s a letter, digit, or underscore. From that, I would assume neither test nor test_ should match test_statd if you pass the -w flag. Are you sure the output of your ps command really contains an underscore? The question mark reminds me of ls‘s behavior when a filename contains an irregular character. If it’s not an underscore, that would explain why grep -w test yields a match.
– Kevin Kruse
Nov 28 at 20:00

From man grep on my CentOS 6.9 machine, the -w flag states it will only match if the match forms a whole word. A character is part of a word if it’s a letter, digit, or underscore. From that, I would assume neither test nor test_ should match test_statd if you pass the -w flag. Are you sure the output of your ps command really contains an underscore? The question mark reminds me of ls‘s behavior when a filename contains an irregular character. If it’s not an underscore, that would explain why grep -w test yields a match.
– Kevin Kruse
Nov 28 at 20:00

@KevinKruse removed -w. thats not the issue, sorry for that. thanks
– ilansch
Nov 28 at 20:02

@KevinKruse removed -w. thats not the issue, sorry for that. thanks
– ilansch
Nov 28 at 20:02

@JeffSchaller i am not familiar with the locale in linux, all my labs are usually english, this is a situation happend on a customer machine, I am trying to reproduce, i changed the locale in my lab from en_US to fr_BE, LC_ALL= is empty on locale output.
– ilansch
Nov 28 at 20:03

@JeffSchaller i am not familiar with the locale in linux, all my labs are usually english, this is a situation happend on a customer machine, I am trying to reproduce, i changed the locale in my lab from en_US to fr_BE, LC_ALL= is empty on locale output.
– ilansch
Nov 28 at 20:03

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