Listing content from two directories with wildcard

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1

I have a task to list all files from /bin and /usr/bin that contain an e that is neither at the beginning nor at the end.
The wildcard is [!e]*e*[!e] and works.
(Tested commands cd /bin & ls -l [!e]*e*[!e]

The problem is I have to print the contents of both directories using this wildcard in one command. How do I do that?

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  • 1

    try … ls /bin/?*e*? /usr/bin/?*e*?

    – JJoao
    Jan 7 at 16:52

  • Oh sure your version works I forgot that the wildcard specifies a relative path. Thank you!

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 16:54

  • /bin/egrep contains a e that is neither at the beginning nor end, should it be matched? Your wildcard doesn’t match it.

    – Stéphane Chazelas
    Jan 7 at 17:35

  • I might be pendantic and ask if “an” e means exactly one e or allows for more than one?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 17:48

  • @StéphaneChazelas No. The filename must not begin with an e

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 18:11

1

I have a task to list all files from /bin and /usr/bin that contain an e that is neither at the beginning nor at the end.
The wildcard is [!e]*e*[!e] and works.
(Tested commands cd /bin & ls -l [!e]*e*[!e]

The problem is I have to print the contents of both directories using this wildcard in one command. How do I do that?

share|improve this question

  • 1

    try … ls /bin/?*e*? /usr/bin/?*e*?

    – JJoao
    Jan 7 at 16:52

  • Oh sure your version works I forgot that the wildcard specifies a relative path. Thank you!

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 16:54

  • /bin/egrep contains a e that is neither at the beginning nor end, should it be matched? Your wildcard doesn’t match it.

    – Stéphane Chazelas
    Jan 7 at 17:35

  • I might be pendantic and ask if “an” e means exactly one e or allows for more than one?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 17:48

  • @StéphaneChazelas No. The filename must not begin with an e

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 18:11

1

1

1

I have a task to list all files from /bin and /usr/bin that contain an e that is neither at the beginning nor at the end.
The wildcard is [!e]*e*[!e] and works.
(Tested commands cd /bin & ls -l [!e]*e*[!e]

The problem is I have to print the contents of both directories using this wildcard in one command. How do I do that?

share|improve this question

I have a task to list all files from /bin and /usr/bin that contain an e that is neither at the beginning nor at the end.
The wildcard is [!e]*e*[!e] and works.
(Tested commands cd /bin & ls -l [!e]*e*[!e]

The problem is I have to print the contents of both directories using this wildcard in one command. How do I do that?

shell ls wildcards

share|improve this question

share|improve this question

share|improve this question

share|improve this question

asked Jan 7 at 16:45

Daniel HDaniel H

82

82

  • 1

    try … ls /bin/?*e*? /usr/bin/?*e*?

    – JJoao
    Jan 7 at 16:52

  • Oh sure your version works I forgot that the wildcard specifies a relative path. Thank you!

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 16:54

  • /bin/egrep contains a e that is neither at the beginning nor end, should it be matched? Your wildcard doesn’t match it.

    – Stéphane Chazelas
    Jan 7 at 17:35

  • I might be pendantic and ask if “an” e means exactly one e or allows for more than one?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 17:48

  • @StéphaneChazelas No. The filename must not begin with an e

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 18:11

  • 1

    try … ls /bin/?*e*? /usr/bin/?*e*?

    – JJoao
    Jan 7 at 16:52

  • Oh sure your version works I forgot that the wildcard specifies a relative path. Thank you!

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 16:54

  • /bin/egrep contains a e that is neither at the beginning nor end, should it be matched? Your wildcard doesn’t match it.

    – Stéphane Chazelas
    Jan 7 at 17:35

  • I might be pendantic and ask if “an” e means exactly one e or allows for more than one?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 17:48

  • @StéphaneChazelas No. The filename must not begin with an e

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 18:11

1

1

try … ls /bin/?*e*? /usr/bin/?*e*?

– JJoao
Jan 7 at 16:52

try … ls /bin/?*e*? /usr/bin/?*e*?

– JJoao
Jan 7 at 16:52

Oh sure your version works I forgot that the wildcard specifies a relative path. Thank you!

– Daniel H
Jan 7 at 16:54

Oh sure your version works I forgot that the wildcard specifies a relative path. Thank you!

– Daniel H
Jan 7 at 16:54

/bin/egrep contains a e that is neither at the beginning nor end, should it be matched? Your wildcard doesn’t match it.

– Stéphane Chazelas
Jan 7 at 17:35

/bin/egrep contains a e that is neither at the beginning nor end, should it be matched? Your wildcard doesn’t match it.

– Stéphane Chazelas
Jan 7 at 17:35

I might be pendantic and ask if “an” e means exactly one e or allows for more than one?

– Jeff Schaller
Jan 7 at 17:48

I might be pendantic and ask if “an” e means exactly one e or allows for more than one?

– Jeff Schaller
Jan 7 at 17:48

@StéphaneChazelas No. The filename must not begin with an e

– Daniel H
Jan 7 at 18:11

@StéphaneChazelas No. The filename must not begin with an e

– Daniel H
Jan 7 at 18:11

1 Answer
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1

You could boil it down to one command and one (typed) argument:

ls -d {/usr,}/bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

I added -d in case there to be subdirectories matching the pattern. That expands in phases to:

  1. /usr/bin/[^e]*e*[^e] and
  2. /bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

after expanding the braces.

The [^e] requires something other than an e, followed by * anything, followed by an e, followed by * anything, followed by another non-e (followed implicitly by nothing — indicating the end of the filename).

share|improve this answer

  • Looks very interesting but it says: ls: cannot access ‘/usr/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory & ls: cannot access ‘/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 17:05

  • I see you have ! instead of ^ as I used; are you using bash?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 17:11

  • ! is correct in globbing patterns. The pattern would remain unexpanded if it doesn’t match anything.

    – Kusalananda
    Jan 7 at 17:25

  • @JeffSchaller I did try ^ instead of ! but it keeps print the same error. And yes, I use the bash.

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 18:00

  • It would seem to me that you simply don’t have any of those files, then. Does that seem right?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 18:13

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You could boil it down to one command and one (typed) argument:

ls -d {/usr,}/bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

I added -d in case there to be subdirectories matching the pattern. That expands in phases to:

  1. /usr/bin/[^e]*e*[^e] and
  2. /bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

after expanding the braces.

The [^e] requires something other than an e, followed by * anything, followed by an e, followed by * anything, followed by another non-e (followed implicitly by nothing — indicating the end of the filename).

share|improve this answer

  • Looks very interesting but it says: ls: cannot access ‘/usr/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory & ls: cannot access ‘/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 17:05

  • I see you have ! instead of ^ as I used; are you using bash?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 17:11

  • ! is correct in globbing patterns. The pattern would remain unexpanded if it doesn’t match anything.

    – Kusalananda
    Jan 7 at 17:25

  • @JeffSchaller I did try ^ instead of ! but it keeps print the same error. And yes, I use the bash.

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 18:00

  • It would seem to me that you simply don’t have any of those files, then. Does that seem right?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 18:13

1

You could boil it down to one command and one (typed) argument:

ls -d {/usr,}/bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

I added -d in case there to be subdirectories matching the pattern. That expands in phases to:

  1. /usr/bin/[^e]*e*[^e] and
  2. /bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

after expanding the braces.

The [^e] requires something other than an e, followed by * anything, followed by an e, followed by * anything, followed by another non-e (followed implicitly by nothing — indicating the end of the filename).

share|improve this answer

  • Looks very interesting but it says: ls: cannot access ‘/usr/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory & ls: cannot access ‘/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 17:05

  • I see you have ! instead of ^ as I used; are you using bash?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 17:11

  • ! is correct in globbing patterns. The pattern would remain unexpanded if it doesn’t match anything.

    – Kusalananda
    Jan 7 at 17:25

  • @JeffSchaller I did try ^ instead of ! but it keeps print the same error. And yes, I use the bash.

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 18:00

  • It would seem to me that you simply don’t have any of those files, then. Does that seem right?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 18:13

1

1

1

You could boil it down to one command and one (typed) argument:

ls -d {/usr,}/bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

I added -d in case there to be subdirectories matching the pattern. That expands in phases to:

  1. /usr/bin/[^e]*e*[^e] and
  2. /bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

after expanding the braces.

The [^e] requires something other than an e, followed by * anything, followed by an e, followed by * anything, followed by another non-e (followed implicitly by nothing — indicating the end of the filename).

share|improve this answer

You could boil it down to one command and one (typed) argument:

ls -d {/usr,}/bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

I added -d in case there to be subdirectories matching the pattern. That expands in phases to:

  1. /usr/bin/[^e]*e*[^e] and
  2. /bin/[^e]*e*[^e]

after expanding the braces.

The [^e] requires something other than an e, followed by * anything, followed by an e, followed by * anything, followed by another non-e (followed implicitly by nothing — indicating the end of the filename).

share|improve this answer

share|improve this answer

share|improve this answer

edited Jan 7 at 17:12

answered Jan 7 at 17:00

Jeff SchallerJeff Schaller

39.7k1054126

39.7k1054126

  • Looks very interesting but it says: ls: cannot access ‘/usr/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory & ls: cannot access ‘/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 17:05

  • I see you have ! instead of ^ as I used; are you using bash?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 17:11

  • ! is correct in globbing patterns. The pattern would remain unexpanded if it doesn’t match anything.

    – Kusalananda
    Jan 7 at 17:25

  • @JeffSchaller I did try ^ instead of ! but it keeps print the same error. And yes, I use the bash.

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 18:00

  • It would seem to me that you simply don’t have any of those files, then. Does that seem right?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 18:13

  • Looks very interesting but it says: ls: cannot access ‘/usr/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory & ls: cannot access ‘/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 17:05

  • I see you have ! instead of ^ as I used; are you using bash?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 17:11

  • ! is correct in globbing patterns. The pattern would remain unexpanded if it doesn’t match anything.

    – Kusalananda
    Jan 7 at 17:25

  • @JeffSchaller I did try ^ instead of ! but it keeps print the same error. And yes, I use the bash.

    – Daniel H
    Jan 7 at 18:00

  • It would seem to me that you simply don’t have any of those files, then. Does that seem right?

    – Jeff Schaller
    Jan 7 at 18:13

Looks very interesting but it says: ls: cannot access ‘/usr/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory & ls: cannot access ‘/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory

– Daniel H
Jan 7 at 17:05

Looks very interesting but it says: ls: cannot access ‘/usr/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory & ls: cannot access ‘/bin/[!e]*e*[!e]’: No such file or directory

– Daniel H
Jan 7 at 17:05

I see you have ! instead of ^ as I used; are you using bash?

– Jeff Schaller
Jan 7 at 17:11

I see you have ! instead of ^ as I used; are you using bash?

– Jeff Schaller
Jan 7 at 17:11

! is correct in globbing patterns. The pattern would remain unexpanded if it doesn’t match anything.

– Kusalananda
Jan 7 at 17:25

! is correct in globbing patterns. The pattern would remain unexpanded if it doesn’t match anything.

– Kusalananda
Jan 7 at 17:25

@JeffSchaller I did try ^ instead of ! but it keeps print the same error. And yes, I use the bash.

– Daniel H
Jan 7 at 18:00

@JeffSchaller I did try ^ instead of ! but it keeps print the same error. And yes, I use the bash.

– Daniel H
Jan 7 at 18:00

It would seem to me that you simply don’t have any of those files, then. Does that seem right?

– Jeff Schaller
Jan 7 at 18:13

It would seem to me that you simply don’t have any of those files, then. Does that seem right?

– Jeff Schaller
Jan 7 at 18:13

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